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DIVERSITY INCLUSION EQUITY STATEMENT

ERAO   is committed to be a diverse, inclusive, and equitable environment where all board members, staff, volunteers, and members feel respected and valued regardless of gender, age, race, ethnicity, national origin, sexual orientation or identity, disability, education, or any other bias.

We’re committed to being nondiscriminatory and providing equal opportunities for employment, volunteering, and advancement in all areas of our work.

We respect the value that diverse life experiences bring to our board and leadership and we strive to listen to their views and give them value.

We’re committed to modelling diversity, inclusion, and equity and maintaining fair and equal treatment for all.

Our board’s philosophy on our goals to provide informed leadership for diversity, inclusion, and equity include:

We will strive to see diversity, inclusion, and equity in connection with our vision and mission for the benefit of those we serve.

We aim to recognize and address inequities in our policies, programs, and services.

We will update and document progress on our diversity, equity, and inclusion practices.

We promise to investigate underlying assumptions that interfere with our diversity policy.

We commit to advocating for systemic inequities that impact our work at the board level and address it according to this policy and in accordance with our mission.

We commit to challenging commonly accepted notions about what constitutes strong leadership within our organization.

We commit to being transparent about diversity in all our interactions.

We will dedicate our time and resources to expanding greater diversity within our board and leadership positions.

We commit to leading with respect and tolerance and we encourage all employees and volunteers to express this in their work within our organization.

BINDING AGREEMENT TO DIVERSITY ,INCLUSION , AND EQUITY STATEMENT

ERAO agrees to abide by the following action items to promote diversity, inclusion, and equity in our works:
We will create new learning opportunities and formal, transparent policies as we strive for cultural competency throughout our organization.
We will strive to conduct or identify research related to equity so that we can make progress in the area of diversity, inclusion, and equity and we’ll share our findings publicly on our website.
We will take action to improve diversity, inclusion, and equity in our board and leadership positions.
We will identify resources for our underrepresented constituents by networking with other organizations that are also committed to efforts for diversity, inclusion, and equity.
We will develop internal resources that demonstrate our commitment to diversity, inclusion, and equity and present them to our members and members of our community.
We will develop a system to create awareness and address biases during our recruiting, hiring, and evaluating processes.
We will train our personnel to be responsible for orienting, onboarding, and training our staff and volunteers on equitable practices.
We will be transparent about the salary range for public job descriptions.
We will advocate for public and private policies in the public sector that promote diversity, inclusion, and equity and we will challenge systems and policies that describe inequity, disparity, and oppression.
The process of creating a good diversity policy will take time. Diversity policies can range from something that’s fairly simple and not one time accomplishment

Featured

GSC

Learning about ERAO Global Steering Committee

THE GLOBAL STEERING COMMITTEE

What is the global steering committee of professional Transgender serving as the collective decision make, and advisory leaders from all diverse background of profession within Transgender led nonprofit Organization and Civil Society Organization (CSOs)

The GSC Stand for ?

G) GLOBAL

S) STEERING

C) COMMITTE

The Global Steering Committee is the sub governing external board of Equality Rights Africa organization (ERAO) The GSC sets dynamic strategic direction for the Equality Solidarity Fund (ESF), makes decision about funding priorities and develop accountability frame work for Monitoring ,Evaluation and Learning (meal), decides on funding allocation with advice of the IPAG , support fundraising initiative , oversee implementation of ERAO activities including the timing and method of grant making , grantee reporting and approve financial statement fund annual working plan and budget , annual reports, financial statements and audits. GSC shall consist of 8 donor representative and 12 Transgender Leaders from a global location Civil Society Organization serving members and with additional observatory from diverse fund agency, ITF, AIDSFOND , CIVICUS SOLIDARITY FUND, OSISA. and GLOBAL FUND all this group will serve as Fund Transparency Management Accountability.

The FTMA is the fiduciary agent for the Equality Rights Africa Organization (ERAO) and Equality Solidarity Funds , FTMA shall provide strategic supportive administrative services to the Equality Solidarity Fund including entering into contractual agreement with grantees and donors , supporting Financial Management of the ERAO. The IPAG is the Intelligent Program Advisory Group (IPAG) supervised by GSC, The IPAG shall review grants proposal and makes recommendation for funding to the GSC and also provide continuum programmatic advice to the Equality Solidarity Fund Board about opportunities for funding , grantee capacity building , technical support and Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning (meal). The IPAG shall consist of 11 members up to six reserves members. The IPAG members are selected by the GSC for their experience in grant making policy , working with donor fund, advocacy knowledge , programing related ,Civic Space , Global Health , Human Rights Defender ,and Legal profession .

To become a member of GSC is general open to Trans led Organization global

If you are representing organization led by transgender , you can join us , follow the eligibility criteria on this link

https://www.erao-africa.org/gscapply

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.